C45: MoSt Church’s 2017 Bible project

 

Your word is a lamp for my feet, a light on my path. (Psalm 119.105)

Every year at MoSt Church we involve ourselves in a church-wide Bible reading project. This coming year’s project (2017) is called C45 and is a micro-level reading approach.

What does C45 mean? The C in C45 stands for “crucial” and the “45” is the project’s length (45 weeks).

What’s C45 about? In a very few words: as a church, we’ll memorize and meditate on 45 very brief but vital Scriptures between Jan. 8 and Nov. 26, 2017.

Where will we be in the word? We’ll be into the Old Testament (e.g. – Numbers 6.24-26; Psalm 46.1-2; Proverbs 3.5-6; Isaiah 29.13; Micah 6.8). And we’ll also be all over the New Testament (e.g. – Acts 2.38; 3.19; Colossians 3.17; 4.5; Hebrews 4.14-16; 1 John 1.7; Jude 24). At times we’ll focus on a context for awhile, lingering on a chunk of Scripture (e.g. – Matthew 5.3-12a; Philippians 2.2-4; Colossians 1.15-20; James 1.19-21). However, most of the time we’ll be “here and there.”

How long is each week’s text to memorize? No week’s text exceeds 35 words in length (e.g. – Matthew 22.37-38; 1 Peter 1.3). That is very, very doable; not burdensome at all. In fact, many weeks the text length to commit to memory is 25 words or less (e.g. – Exodus 34.6b-7a; Psalm 55.22). Some weeks the text is even uber-brief: think 15 words or less (e.g. – Galatians 5.6b; Philippians 1.21; 1 Thessalonians 5.16-18a).

Which version of the Bible will we use in this project? No one translation, but a variety. However, the CEB, KNT, NIV, NLT, NRSV, and The Voice will predominate. Why? We’ll select on the basis of which works best for that text for this project.

Let me tell you: this is going to be good stuff!

Classes and sermons will supplement. You’ll be encouraged to journal, but memorize for sure. Consider now how you can share such with your friends and/or family then. Get creative.

So, be encouraged and determine to be an encouragement. Gear up with anticipation and prayer. Get thirsty for the word of the Lord and prepare to drink it in.

Remember: C45. Mark it down: January 8. And watch for “C45” in the coming weeks/months and you’ll see much more word to come on this project throughout the coming weeks/months.

All of Scripture is God-breathed; in its inspired voice, we hear useful teaching, rebuke, correction, instruction, and training for a life that is right so that God’s people may be up to the task ahead and have all they need to accomplish every good work. (2 Timothy 3.16-17, The Voice)
c45

links: this went thru my mind

Application, Bible reading, interpretation, meditation, obedience & reflection: * Reading the Bible vs. Being Read by the Bible; * Asking the Bible to Do More Than It Does

* “I suspect it was for my failure that God had been waiting.”

* “According to Scripture we do not first know and comprehend the way and then decide to follow it; it is rather the one who is on the journey who knows that he is on the right way. Knowledge comes only in action and decision. Only he who is in truth will recognize the truth.”

Archaeology, credibility, discernment, hoaxes, reality & scams: Questions to Ask of Sensational Stories

“… I suggest that the following questions be asked as you read …”

Communication, literary devices, public speaking & writing: 10 Literary Devices that Actually Work

“If you want to become a better writer, using literary devices is a way to add spice.”

Government, politics & voting: Greg on Politics

“Think deeply about what it means to be a follower of Jesus and whether or not you should be having any allegiance to the politics of this world.”

links: this went thru my mind

Advertising, Big Data, duplicity, Facebook & privacy: With New Ad Platform, Facebook Opens Gates to Its Vault of User Data

“Facebook built itself into the No. 2 digital advertising platform in the world by analyzing the vast amount of data it had on each of its 1.3 billion users to sell individually targeted ads on its social network. Now it is going to take those targeted ads to the rest of the Internet … On Monday [this past], Facebook will roll out a rebuilt ad platform, called Atlas, that will allow marketers to tap its detailed knowledge of its users to direct ads to those people on thousands of other websites and mobile apps.”

Brain, reading, reflection & thinking skills: Your Paper Brain and Your Kindle Brain aren’t the Same Thing [essential reading, not skimming]

“Neuroscience, in fact, has revealed that humans use different parts of the brain when reading from a piece of paper or from a screen. So the more you read on screens, the more your mind shifts towards ‘non-linear’ reading — a practice that involves things like skimming a screen or having your eyes dart around a web page. ‘They call it a ‘bi-literate’ brain,’ Zoromodi says. ‘The problem is that many of us have adapted to reading online just too well. And if you don’t use the deep reading part of your brain, you lose the deep reading part of your brain.'”

Distraction, education, learning, multi-tasking, & technology: Why a Leading Professor of New Media Just Banned Technology Use in Class

“I teach theory and practice of social media at New York University, and am an advocate and activist for the free culture movement, so I’m a pretty unlikely candidate for Internet censor. But I have just asked the students in my fall seminar to refrain from using laptops, tablets, and phones in class.”

E-mail, productivity & work flow: 9 Rules For Emailing From Google Exec Eric Schmidt

“In a new book out this week chock full of Google-flavored business wisdom, How Google Works, Google executive chairman and former CEO Eric Schmidt and former Senior Vice President of Products Jonathan Rosenberg share nine insightful rules for emailing … like a professional.”

Exercise, peace, stress & worry: Best To Not Sweat The Small Stuff, Because It Could Kill You

“… it’s not the stress from major life events like divorce, illness and job loss trickled down to everyday life that gets you; it’s how you react to the smaller, everyday stress. The most stressed-out people have the highest risk of premature death, according to one study that followed 1,293 men for years. ‘People who always perceived their daily life to be over-the-top stressful were three times more likely to die over the period of study than people who rolled with the punches and didn’t find daily life very stressful,’ according to Carolyn Aldwin.”

putting skin on the sermon: walk in the light

 

Sunset-2013-11-11Yesterday morning’s sermon worked out of John 12.35-36. In that passage, Jesus paints a mental picture for the crowd:

“The light is with you for only a little while. Walk while you have the light so that darkness doesn’t overtake you. Those who walk in the darkness don’t know where they are going. As long as you have the light, believe in the light so that you might become people whose lives are determined by the light.”

The image is of someone walking with purpose, and perhaps with a bit of hustle, trying to get to their destination, before nightfall (“walk while you have the light so that darkness doesn’t overtake you”). Their way may not be familiar to them and could even hold any number of problems that could leave them vulnerable. Such a person has one objective in mind: to avoid the delay and the possible dangers that would come from getting lost (“those who walk in the darkness don’t know where they are going”). Consequently, every decision they make, every step they take along the way, they make on the amount of light they still have at the moment. They are “people whose lives are determined by the light.”

Jesus claimed to be the light in our life:

“I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me won’t walk in darkness but will have the light of life.” (John 8.12)

There is no time for delay in choosing to believe him and walk with him, in his light. Time is not our friend and neither is darkness. He urges us to “… believe in the light so that” so that we will “become people whose lives are determined” by him. If we do so, he will bring us safely to where we belong: home with him.

So how can we walk daily, and all day long, with such clear purpose and determination? Here are three things that can assist you in your journey.

1. Start each day well in your heart. That is, start with Christ your Lord clearly in focus. Get your mind right and the rest will follow. One way to do this is to make a portion of Scripture a point of reflection and meditation as soon as you get up in the morning. Here’s an exercise to get you started with that habit: take a few minutes to watch the day dawn, moving from darkness to light, meditating on Ephesians 5.8-9 as you do so. Do this every day for a week. This passage reads:

“You were once darkness, but now you are light in the Lord, so live your life as children of light. Light produces fruit that consists of every sort of goodness, justice, and truth.”

2. Take a few moments throughout the course of each day to deliberately recall the true Lord to whom you belong. Think of such as something like a soft reset or reboot of your operating system, your spirit.

“All of you are children of light and children of the day. We don’t belong to night or darkness.” (1 Thessalonians 5.5)

Remember some of the horizontal blessings you enjoy because of your walk with the Lord and thank him for such.

“… if we live in the light in the same way as he is in the light, we have fellowship with each other …” (1 John 1.7a)

Pray a brief prayer of thanksgiving as well for the ultimate vertical blessing we have because of our Savior:

“…  and the blood of Jesus, his Son, cleanses us from every sin.” (1 John 1.7b)

3. End the thoughts of each day well. Consider your last conscious thoughts of the day as your way of preparing and supplying your mind for it’s effort and rest while you sleep. You might do this by going for an evening walk with someone. Try deliberately walking toward the setting sun and discussing John 12.35 as you go. Remember it?

“Walk while you have the light so that darkness doesn’t overtake you. Those who walk in the darkness don’t know where they are going.”