what follows you?

And I heard a voice from heaven say, “Write this: Favored are the dead who die in the Lord from now on.”

“Yes,” says the Spirit, “so they can rest from their labors, because their deeds follow them.” (Revelation 14:13 CEB)

What fills your mind when you stop to consider God’s awareness of all that you do? Is it the questions you have? How you rarely think of such? That you try not to think about it?

What grips your heart when you pause and reflect on the fact that someday your life will be assessed by God in light of all that you do? Is it uneasiness? Shame? Fear? Terror?

What wells up in your spirit when you pause over these words of God’s Spirit for yourself: “their deeds follow them?” A sense of regret over things you’ve done? Have left undone? How you wish you could do more?

Now read this passage again slowly and ask yourself exactly what it is the writer, John, intended to convey to us by hearing these words.

“Favored are the dead who die in the Lord from now on.”

“Yes,” says the Spirit, “so they can rest from their labors, because their deeds follow them.” (Revelation 14:13 CEB)

Who is being spoken of? Those who “die in the Lord.” How are we to view their condition? As “favored,” that is, “well off in the eyes of God.” What do they experience? “… rest from their labors …”

Now thus far, to say this is “good” is an understatement, no? Without a doubt! Now ask this passage, and yourself, one more question.
On what basis is it that this text says those who die in the Lord are well off in God’s eyes and experience rest?

Answer: “… because their deeds follow them.”

Clearly John is not holding out to us uneasiness or fear, regret or shame, uncertainties or questions. He is deliberately extending to those who labor in the Lord the great assurance, comfort, confidence, peace, security, and serenity that can, and does, come directly from the Spirit of God.

In other words, what you do matters. It matters for good. It matters here and now. It matters forever. It matters for others. And it matters for you.

Your good, no matter how large or small, is remembered by God. The power of your good work in the name of Christ is not dependent on its remembrance by others or even on your own memory. The good you do simply because you are in the Lord and you let him come out through you, as it were, go with you beyond the grave into God’s presence with you. And our awareness of that reality, made known to us by revelation, is a gift to God to us to encourage and spur us on to never cease doing good.

We will do good and not even realize it. We will do good and forget we even did it. We will do good and others will not even know it, remember it, or care. But God cares and remembers perfectly. God does not forget and will do good to those who live their lives expressive of his goodness, being “in him” and “for him” in life.

In this, let your mind find peace, your heart have rest, your spirit take comfort, and your hands, busyness to do good until the day you die. For what you do always matters.

Father God in heaven, remember me for good and help me to remember you in all things, that I might live well by you in Christ’s name. Amen.

this went thru my mind

Church attendance & being visitor-friendly: (1) There Once Was a World by Peter L. Steinke and (2) It’s In the Details: 8 Surprising Reasons Why People Aren’t Coming Back by Greg Atkinson.

Contentment: Transparency: U.S. of Unhappy Campers (infographic) is enough to make you a bit unhappy.

Expectations: Tony Schwartz’s article entitled “We’re In a New Energy Crisis. This One is Personal” in the Harvard Business Review is required reading.

Inspiring: People Are Awesome: Fifth Grader Donates $300 Life Savings to Stop Teacher Layoffs.

Modesty: “Why Do We Let Them Dress Like That?” appeared in the Wall Street Journal.

Prayer: (1) On prayer: fourteen theses and (2) Why Do Muslims Pray Five Times Daily?

Theodicy: (1) N.T. Wright on tsunamis and problem of evil (1 hour video, worth every minute), (2) Adam Hamilton’s Japan’s Earthquake and the Will of God, and (3) Shane Raynor’s post entitled Is Adam Hamilton Right About God and Japan?

Writing: How to Write 1,000 Words by Scott Berkun: the essay and the 5 min. time-lapse video.