links: this went thru my mind

 

Benevolence, poor, poverty, prosperity & work: There’s No Such Thing as the Worthy Poor

“There is no such thing as the worthy poor. Don’t get me wrong. I see how the book of Proverbs is strewn with verses that trumpet the virtue of work and warn of the dangers of sloth. Hard work is indeed a virtue. And we should be leery of scams.  But the problem is that too many of us assume that because a person is poor, then that must mean he or she just isn’t working hard enough.”

Capital punishment & the death death penalty: The Biblical Case Against the Death Penalty, From a Former Supporter

“‘Capital punishment is against the best judgment of modern criminology and, above all, against the highest expression of love in the nature of God.’ (Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.)”

Divorce: Mourning the Destructiveness of Divorce

“One must have a heart of iron to pretend that all is fine, when children must suffer so badly for the selfishness of their parents; when children must be “grown up,” so that their parents can persist in behaving like self-willed children. The real harm, however, cannot be captured by numbers. No human thing can ever really be. What the divorce regime has done is to infect with transience what ought to be the most intimate and enduring of human bonds. It has eradicated from our minds the very idea of a complete and irrevocable self-donation.”

Genocide, martyrdom & persecution: Leader: ISIS is ‘Systematically Beheading Children’ in ‘Christian Genocide’

“‘They are systematically beheading children,'” Arabo repeated slowly. ‘And mothers and fathers. The world hasn’t seen an evil like this for generations. There’s actually a park in Mosul where they actually beheaded children and put their heads on a stick … this is crimes against humanity. They are doing the most horrendous, the most heart-breaking crimes that you can think of.'”

Turkey: The Pilgrimage: Turkey [a 22-part series by Ben Witherington about his recent trip to Turkey; part 1; part 22]

“Touring Turkey after touring Israel is like touring Texas after touring Rhode Island. The difference in size, scope, and amount of things to see is enormous. … I suggest you sit back in your easy chair with your laptop, get a good cup of coffee, and prepare to be surprised by what amazing things there are to see and do and be edified by in Turkey. Let ole Uncle Ben be your guide …”

links: this went thru my mind

 

Anti-Semitism & Jesus: Jesus was a Jew (and I am not)

“Jesus taught like a Jew. Dressed like a Jew. Thought like a Jew. Ate like a Jew. Sabbathed like a Jew. Spoke like a Jew. Jesus taught, dressed, thought, ate, talked, and got his sabbath on like a Jew because–are you ready for it?–Jesus was a Jew. He came from Jewish parents. He was raised in a tiny Jewish town. Probably grew up learning Torah, the primary sacred text for Jewish children.”

Blessing, repentance & war: The Chaplain Who Blessed the Hiroshima Bombers, Repents

“Sixty-nine years ago, as a Catholic Air Force chaplain, Father George Zabelka blessed the men who dropped the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Over the next twenty years, he gradually came to believe that he had been terribly wrong, that he had denied the very foundations of his faith by lending moral and religious support to the bombing. Zabelka, who died in 1992, gave this speech on the 40th anniversary of the bombings. He left this message for the world.”

Childishness, cooperation, division, harmony, intolerance, partisanship & unityThe Headlong Retreat into Childhood Partisanship

“We are witnessing today a headlong retreat into the not-knowing and simplistic partisanship of childhood. Ideas that make people uncomfortable are banished. Science that calls faith into question is shouted down. Politics isn’t just hardball, it’s dumb-ball: I must win, at any cost, and you must lose. I am right, and you are wrong. My tribe is the only tribe that has value and rights. …

What is the way beyond partisan thinking? First, other points of view need to insist on being heard. … Second, rituals of compromise need to be maintained. …

“Extremist partisans are children out of control. They need “grownups” in the room to remind everyone that poison in the air kills all who breathe it.”

Guests, visitors & welcome: * 11 Church Hospitality Tips to Serve Guests; * 7 Easy Ways to Put a Not Welcome Sign on Your Church

* “… a list of 11 small things your church can do to make your guests feel more welcome.”

* “From personal experience — here are some ways you can place a closed sign to visitors on your church.”

links: this went thru my mind

 

Blessing, kingdom living & love: The Kingdom of God While Mowing the Lawn [essential reading]

“… the first task Jesus gave this disciples when he sent them out to serve and evangelize the world was to bless every house they came upon (Luke 10). This, he suggested, is our first and most basic act of loving service to the world. We are to be a people who simply express God’s love by blessing people. We are to agree with God that each and every person we see was worth Jesus dying for. And we express this first and foremost by blessing them.”

Brain, dementia, health & mental health: Brain Games that Could Pay Off in Retirement

“While the scientific community has more to learn, for now it’d be hard to go wrong finding a progressively challenging hobby that you enjoy, and that won’t break the bank. Park and her research team decided to focus on quilting and photography, but other activities they considered studying were learning a second language, learning a musical instrument, dancing and bridge.

“Physical exercise is also essential. Studies have shown that aerobic exercise improves memory and brain function, in party by increasing blood flow to the brain. Also, remember to shake things up every once in a while: Vary your workout, learn something new, visit new places. Said Small, ‘The brain loves novelty.'”

God, forgiveness, suffering & time: Is God Inside or Outside of Time?

“… does this mean that God can simultaneously view all moments in time and know what is going to happen in the future without infringing on human free will?”

Grief: 1 Things Pastors Should Never Say to the Grieving

“Immediately after he passed away, a nurse came in and made an empty attempt at comfort, ‘He’s in a better place’ she said. As soon as the words were uttered they seemed to bounce around the room with nowhere to comfortably land.”

Roads, Roman Empire, & travel in the ancient world: Roman Roads and Milestones in Judaea/Palaestina

“… a systematic survey of all the extant remains related to roads, in order to provide a comprehensive picture of the Roman road network in Israel.”

doing something vs. praying (doing nothing)

 

If you’re a Christian, more than once you’ve likely heard, or thought, of prayer as the opposite of work.

God have mercy!

For prayer is surely some of the hardest work done on this planet. And we all know it. Perhaps we have just momentarily forgotten the fact.

  • Ever pray when your body was weary, your eyes were heavy, and there were a thousand things crying for your attention? Then you know prayer requires real effort.
  • Ever pray while you were so burdened with your own shortcomings, failures, and sins that your prayers seemed empty or meaningless? Then you truly exerted yourself.
  • Ever pray when the words simply would not come, no matter how hard you tried? Then you knew the industry of prayer.
  • Ever kept talking to God when he seemed silent and non-responsive when it was your loved one who was gravely ill or in danger? That was truly hard labor.

Still not persuaded? Then try telling Jesus, the one in whose name you pray, that prayer isn’t work.

  • Tell him as you recall him daily getting up before others did to walk to a quiet place to pray. This was not done without deliberate, disciplined effort.
  • Tell him as you see him sweating blood in prayer in Gethsemane’s Garden. This was not done without a workman’s pirit of love, determination, and grit.
  • Tell him as you overhear him pray the most difficult of prayers – praying forgiveness for one’s enemies – with labored breath on his cross. This was not done without years of toil and testing in the field ahead of time for that very moment.
  • Tell him as your grasp the fact he intercedes for you still. This is far from “nothing;” more like the most precious of “something.”

So shout it from the rooftop: prayer, rightly done, is difficult, daily labor. And perhaps that’s why more prayers are not offered – because it is w-o-r-k!

After all, it is not an effortless thing just to try to wrap our head around the idea that the Most High Holy One works at listening to us. And what are we? Dust. But surely the vainest of things is to work in his name without praying, for what are our efforts without the work of the Lord mingled with them?

Prayer is work; make no mistake about it. And make not the mistake of not working at it.