eluding our idols: twenty questions on 1 John 2.28-3.12

This coming Sunday (Jan. 11) at 9:00 a.m., some of our adult classes at MoSt Church will continue in a study entitled Eluding Our Idols. It’s a close look at what’s commonly known as John’s letters (1, 2 & 3 John). To help you get ready for this encounter with Scripture and our discussion of it, you’ll find the following below: (a) the text of 1 John 2.28-3.12 and (b) twenty questions and exercises to go along with this reading.

receiving this word

And now, little children, remain in relationship to Jesus, so that when he appears we can have confidence and not be ashamed in front of him when he comes. If you know that he is righteous, you also know that every person who practices righteousness is born from him.

See what kind of love the Father has given to us in that we should be called God’s children, and that is what we are! Because the world didn’t recognize him, it doesn’t recognize us.

Dear friends, now we are God’s children, and it hasn’t yet appeared what we will be. We know that when he appears we will be like him because we’ll see him as he is. And everyone who has this hope in him purifies himself even as he is pure. Every person who practices sin commits an act of rebellion, and sin is rebellion. You know that he appeared to take away sins, and there is no sin in him. Every person who remains in relationship to him does not sin. Any person who sins has not seen him or known him.

Little children, don’t let anyone deceive you. The person who practices righteousness is righteous, in the same way that Jesus is righteous. The person who practices sin belongs to the devil, because the devil has been sinning since the beginning. God’s Son appeared for this purpose: to destroy the works of the devil. Everyone who is fathered by God does not go on sinning, because God’s offspring remain in him; they cannot go on sinning, because they have been fathered by God. That is how it is clear who are the children of God and who are the children of the devil: everyone who doesn’t practice righteousness is not of God, particularly the person who doesn’t love their brother or sister. This is the message that you heard from the beginning: love each other. Don’t behave like Cain, who belonged to the evil one and murdered his brother. And why did he kill him? He killed him because his own works were evil, but the works of his brother were right. (1 John 2.28-3.12 CEB)

wrestling with this word

1. What exactly does it mean to “remain in relationship to Christ?” (2.28a) How might this call have been especially challenging to John’s original audience? How is it challenging to us today?

2. How real to you is the prospect of Christ’s future appearance? (2.28b)

3. What gives us the ability to delight in, not dread, Christ’s coming appearance? (2.28b)

4. How is 2.29 a rebuke to those who left? How is it confidence/motivation to those who stayed?

5. What descriptors or declarations in Scripture speak deeply to you of God’s love for you (3.1a)?

6. Since the world rejected Christ, should Christians expect/seek, better treatment by it (3.1b)?

7. “… we’ll see him as he is.” (3.2b) What is John telling us we’ll see God to be?

8. How is our holiness fed and fueled by hope (3.3)?

9. “… sin is rebellion.” (3.4) What does this tell you about sin? About you? About God?

10. Why is sin not to be trifled with? (3.5-6) What sin(s) have been called out thus far in 1 John?

11. “… don’t let anyone deceive you.” (3.7a) How can a person grow to become less deceivable?

12. What does John mean in 3.7b? What does he not mean?

13. A person belongs to the one they serve. (3.8a) Thoughts?

14. Christ came to destroy the devil’s work. (3.8b) How exactly did he do that?

15. Is John saying Christians can mature to such a point that they cease to sin? (3.9) Explain.

16. Compare 3.10 with 2.9-11. How are these texts similar? In what ways do they differ?

17. Which archery target ring is labeled “do right?” Which is labeled “do right by others?” (3.10b)

18. Why is it just so plain difficult at times for Christians to just love each other? (3.10b-11)

19. Why did God reject Cain’s sacrifice? Was it about his offering or his life? (3.12; cf. Gen. 4.7)

20. What lessons does John expect his readers to glean from the Cain and Abel account (3.12)?