links: this went thru my mind

 

Children & parenting: How to Raise a Kid Who Isn’t Whiny and Annoying

“I’m raising children in a privileged world. We have food. Money to save for an education. At 2, my daughter has a room that is bigger than any room I’ve ever occupied in my life. We can afford the fancy Easter dress. When we have a bad day, we can afford to get a special treat. I’m glad I’m raising a child in this environment. … But now that we are here, I wonder if we really are doing things the right way … I do know that as a parent, it begins with me. I set the limits. …

“This is where we begin. My refusal to compare myself with the other mother I see on the Internet and to build a life that embraces the important and repels the petty. And I only hope that lesson extends. If not, I am building a backlog of ‘Oh, you want to see not fair?’ lectures. Just in case.”

Christianity, church, class, race & social distinctions: The Race Card of the Early Christians – What They Can Teach Us Today [essential reading]

“For the first two hundred years, the Christians only addressed each other by their first names. The reason? Because their last names indicated their social position in society.

“Here was a classless, raceless society where all social distinctions were erased.

“To their minds, Jew and Gentile, slave and free, rich and poor no longer existed. The early believers saw themselves as part of the same family . They were a new race . . . a colony from another realm, not of or from this earth. Yet for this earth.”

Church, discipleship, ministry, & success: Maybe Our Churches Need Less of ‘More’ [essential reading]

“… what if God’s metric for “good” has very little to do with ‘more?’ … Instead, I’m talking about all of the insidious ways we succumb to the pressure to do and have more.”

Doubt, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, & Mormons: Some Mormons Search the Web and Find Doubt

“A survey of more than 3,300 Mormon disbelievers, released last year, found that more than half of the men and four in 10 of the women had served in leadership positions in the church.”

Poverty & upward mobility: In Climbing Income Ladder, Location Matters [consider the map, even if you don’t read the article]

“A study finds the odds of rising to another income level are notably low in certain cities … The study — based on millions of anonymous earnings records and being released this week by a team of top academic economists — is the first with enough data to compare upward mobility across metropolitan areas. These comparisons provide some of the most powerful evidence so far about the factors that seem to drive people’s chances of rising beyond the station of their birth, including education, family structure and the economic layout of metropolitan areas. … ‘Where you grow up matters. … There is tremendous variation across the U.S. in the extent to which kids can rise out of poverty.'”

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