word for the weak: week forty-two

 

The theme connecting this week’s Scripture readings in MoSt Church‘s Uncommon Truth for Common People project is moderation. Following is the week’s schedule:

• Mon., Oct. 15 – Genesis 25.19-34; Hebrews 12.16-17
• Tues., Oct. 16 – Exodus 16.9-30; Psalm 78.15-32
• Wed., Oct. 17 – Proverbs 21.20; Matthew 6.25-34
• Thur., Oct. 18 – 1 Corinthians 6.12-20; Philippians 3.1-21
• Fri., Oct. 19 – Proverbs 23.19-21; 2 Peter 1.3-11

This week’s memory verse is 1 Corinthians 6.12: “I have the freedom to do anything, but not everything is helpful. I have the freedom to do anything, but I won’t be controlled by anything.”

this went thru my mind

 

Bible reading & lectio divina: Lectio Divina: A Critical and Religious Reading of the Bible by Daniel Harrington

“… lectio divina (“sacred reading”) … has four steps: reading, meditation, prayer, and action. (1) Reading. Here the question is, What does the text say? … (2) Meditation. Here the question is, What does the text say to me? … (3) Prayer. Here the question is, What do I want to say to God on the basis of this text? … (4) Contemplation/Action. Those who pray with Scripture often find the exercise so engaging that they want to stay with the text, further relish its details, and integrate it into their piety. This is contemplation. Still others find that their engagement with the text may prompt them to take action.”

Capital punishment, love, mercy, murder & rape: My Most Difficult Choice: Sharing God’s Love with a Condemned Child Rapist and Murderer by Al Maxey

“… when God calls us to make choices in life, He doesn’t promise they will be easy ones. What He does promise is to give us the power and strength to meet the responsibilities and challenges of those choices.”

Change: Overcoming the Reason People Resist Change by Dan Rockwell

“Change becomes real when we have to change our own attitudes and behaviors, not until.”

Mental illness: Mental Illness, Violence and a Call for the Church by Amy Simpson

“Did you know that people with mental illness are generally no more violent than the general population? Statistically, it’s true. … Yet with our sensational media coverage and quick stereotypes, people tend to believe that their neighbors with mental illness are ticking time bombs, violent criminals just waiting for the right time to attack. The media’s emphasis on a person’s history of mental illness is meaningless. A full 25 percent of the U. S. population has a history of diagnosable mental illness. And many more of us have a history of treatment for mental health, considering all our visits to counselors. It’s not unusual in any way to have a history of treatment for mental health, yet its emphasis reinforces fear of mental illness in society and in the church itself. Such an ungenerous view of people is unbecoming for followers of Christ.”

Ministry: Lashed to the Mast: John Frye

“We are going to ordain you to this ministry, and we want your vow to stick to it. This is not a temporary job assignment but a way of life that we need lived out in our community. … Promise right now you want give in to what we demand of you. You are not the minister of our changing desires, our time-conditioned understanding of our needs, our secularized hopes for something better. With these vows we are lashing you to the mast of Word and sacrament so you will be unable to respond to our siren voices.”

Politics: Tony Campolo and Shane Claiborne: A Dialogue on Politics

“The work of community, love, reconciliation, restoration is the work we cannot leave up to politicians. This is the work we are all called to do. We can’t wait on politicians to change the world. We can’t wait on governments to legislate love. And we don’t let policies define how we treat people; how we treat people shapes our policies.”

Religion & spirituality: Someone Says, “I’m Spiritual but Not Religious,” What Could Be Wrong With That?

“… one can’t afford to view spirituality as a substitute for religion. A spirituality that is disconnected from religious tradition is bereft of both community and history; it has no recourse to the benefits of a larger body of discourse and practice, and it lacks accountability. Such spirituality quickly becomes privatized and rootless, something directly opposite to the Christian understanding of ‘life in the Spirit.”